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20121111
20121111
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
from washington the mclaughlin group, the american original. for over three decades sources, hardest talk. >>> issue one. still chief. >>> thank you, thank you so much. tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward. tonight, in this election you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back, and we know, in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. whether you held an obama sign or a romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference. >>> the tally. president obama 50%. 58 millian votes. mitt romney, 48%. 56 million votes. so much for the popular vote. the electoral vote. 270 needed to win. president obama 303, governor romney 206. still unassigned, 29, florida is conducting a recount. >>> was this election a mandate, a landslide, a rout, a speaker, a marginal win, what was it? >> it is a significant victory by the preside
both chambers. >> schieffer: if upcertainty over making a deal were not enough, washington was rocked by the scandal involving c.i.a. chief david petraeus. we'll get the latest on petraeus and the chances of compromise on the financial argument from republican senator lindsey graham. we'll get insight on the pretty thinking from his top strategist, david axelrod. then we'll go to our all-star panel of analysts. peggy noonan of the ""wall street journal"." david gergen of harvard university. dee dee myers of "vanity fair." and our own john dickerson. election 2012 is in the bookes, but the story is just beginning. and this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. on this veteran's day. and we begin with senator graham who is in clemson, south carolina. senator, thank you for coming. you are on the armed services committee, of course, so i want to start out with this out-of-the blue thunderbolt that hit washington friday concerning david petraeus the c.i.a. director. he resigne
about the bridge tollburrcrat necessary washington dc wreaking our energy supply. i believe in the natural gas revolution . it is 10 percent of our energy supply here in the united states and creating two million jobs and germany is afraid of how powerful our natural gas energy is. i hope that reduces the discomfort. >> victoria. is natural gas green enoug for the president. it is a fossil fuel . >> not as clean as bird cleaning windows. the president doesn't want high gras -- gas prices. i am not worried about spiking gas prices. what will increase gas prices is turmoil in the middle east and demand from t u.s. consumer . we are not in recovery mde. and so we are certainly not going to see large spikes in gas prices. >> rick, we have to remember it was the president's energy czar said maybe higher gas prices would b good for the world. >> yeah, never going to let him forget that. have i er told you how smart emac is when her head is screwed on crosscourtly. she had it right. there is it a report out this week that shows initial gas will triple over the next couple of years.
and direction of. and with colorado and washington is a huge geo on a drug prohibition that is how it will end in this country like alcohol prohibition. john: alcohol prohibition was repealed by individual states before the federal government? >> one dozen states by the end of the period. john: new york was three years. 104 -- 10 years and forstmann was up to the fed. >> states lived in open defiance than the federal government cannot enforce it the fast majority is that the state level there are not enough agents to go to every colorado pot smoker. >> gapped the same time goodie a was warning people listen, a federal laws are still enforced. but the shift to marriage equality maine, maryland. john: stay on marijuana. >> i am happy to stay on marijuana. [laughter] john: that does not mean they're not in trouble and the obama administration had more dispensaries. >> actually the clinton administrations started to raid merit -- medical marijuana dispensaries that became the goal. john: even after saying we would not. >> exactly. it is of major issue not about drug legalization but can the states
yesterday to vote in a libertarian and direction of. and with colorado and washington is a huge geo on a drug prohibition that is how it will end in this country like alcohol prohibition. john: alcohol prohibition was repealed by individual states before the federal government? >> one dozen states by the end of the period. john: new york was three years. 104 -- 10 years and forstmann was up to the fed. >> states lived in open defiance than the federal government cannot enforce it the fast majority is that the state level there are not enough agents to go to every colorado pot smoker. >> gapped the same time goodie a was warning people listen, a federal laws are still enforced. but the shift to marriage equality maine, maryland. john: stay on marijuana. >> i am happy to stay on marijuana. [laughter] john: that does not mean they're not in trouble and the obama administration had more dispensaries. >> actually the clinton administrations started to raid merit -- medical marijuana dispensaries that became the goal. john: even after saying we would not. >> exactly. it is of major issue
was a lawyer and church member that the mormons had sent to washington as their delegate to congress. brigham young was, to put it mildly, not very happy with either babbitt or the federal appointees. he did not want nonmormons to interfere with the church's control of utah's politics. also he had heard all sorts of negative reports about babbitt's activities in washington. babbitt had drunk too much, he had cozied up to politicians hoping to get a territorial appointment for himself, all sorts of things. shortly after babbitt's return to utah, young summoned him to his office at 8:00 in the morning. young rarely started the day so early. he liked to go to bed late and get up late, and i think because of that he may have been in an especially cantankerous mood for the meeting. babbitt began by reporting that president fillmore hoped that you would not mingle your religion with your politics. the president worried that young would be as a prince of this world and a prophet for the next. babbitt and young then argued over a few things; federal appropriations for the territory. babbitt had bough
. >> gregg: new details emerging in a scandal rocking washington from c.i.a. headquarters to the white house even capitol hill. at the center of the storm, former c.i.a. director david petraeus and his biographer lawmakers are asking questions who knew what and when did they know it. >> reporter: f.b.i. never give anyone a head up. david petraeus was at the center of an investigation and the chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee says she plans an investigation of her own to find out why. senator dianne feinstein revealed that the affair came to light after the bureau was trying to figure out who was harassing another female friend of petraeus. >> there was somebody else he knew and he was close to. mrs. broadwell sent these threatening e-mails to her. she was frightened and she went to the f.b.i.. >> reporter: petraeus is no longer to testify in front of congress about benghazi but lindsay graham the truth will never come out if petraeus keeps quiet forever. >> we have a national security failure in the making. i don't see how in the world you can find out what happened in benghazi
through to my "washington post" column. let's get started now. >>> let's get right to our panel to talk about just how you plan for a successful second term in the white house. my guests are all old white house hands. they are ken duberstein, who was white house chief of staff in ronald reagan's second term. john podesta had the same job in bill clinton's second term. and cnn's david gergen advised those two presidents plus presidents nixon and ford. john, you were there before and during the transition and chief of staff in the second term. how do you re-energize an administration going into the second term? is it important to change personnel? is it important to have new policy initiative? what were your lessons? >> well, there's a natural changing of personnel because these are grueling jobs so a lot of people are going to leave. we know the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of treasury tim geithner are leaving. those are two of the all-stars in the administration. so there's going to be a lot of turnover. and what you want is both a certain level of experience in your
, not a word we hear often in washington. if there is compromise to avoid this fiscal cliff, where does it come? john boehner indicated, revenue is possible, but we're not raising tax rates. where is there compromise? >> i think where there's going to be a compromise on taxes, this be would be a good thing on the economy, might exchange lower tax rates in return for a reduction in all the loopholes that as it is distort economic activity. so if boehner were able to achieve that kind of compromise, that's one that the republicans could be pleased with. the bush tax cuts are gone, they're expiring, and the president said that 250,000 below, he wants that extended, but for those making more than 250, will the bush tax cuts come to an end? >> i don't think so. i think actually the they won't come to an end because the democrats don't want major reduction in spending, if you hit the cliff, the spending would go down and politicians love to spend money. an extension of the bush tax cuts, less we're blessed by the relatively few, jeff baso, the late steve jobs, you want to remove the barriers to their
.s. dangling over the fiscal cliff. washington can't get its act together. speaker boehner challenging president obama to lead us. his first comments on the economy sense reelection, he seems emboldened by his reelection. with more on this, chris stirewalt. it is great to have you here. i want to start by talking abut what the president had to say today. he seemed pretty firm on what he said so far about what we need to do with taxes in this country. here is the president. >> i am open to compromise. i am open to new ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. [applause] gerri: chris, jay carney comes out a few minutes later and he says, well, the president says he will raise taxes on wealthy. so where is the compromise? >> the hope is that the compromise lies in a broader reform. but as you know, this comes down to chime in. you have
. tom wolfe was born and raised in richmond, virginia, educated at washington university and later learned a ph.d. from yale. he spent his first ten years as a newspaper man mostly doing general assignment reporting, and i bet if i called on many of you, you could easily name his novels; "the right stuff," "in our time," "the bonfire of the vanities" and many more, and now "back to blood" which reflects miami back to all of us. how are we going to react to that? he is credited with the birth of new journalism and the death of the american novel by some. he is the mark twain of our time. how lucky are we to have a moment in time with him? and what better way to start this conversation -- hopefully i can get them to come to the stage -- than with a published author in his own right and a man whose name is synonymous with leadership, our own former mayor, manny diaz. manny diaz, let me turn it to you. hopefully, we can get him up here, and tom wolfe. please welcome them. [applause] >> well, good evening, everybody. and let's get this started. if "bonfire of the vanities," you chose ne
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)